STUDY: Smartphones are draining our brains even we we aren't using them

Talk about some serious food for thought.

According to researchers, "The mere presence of one’s own smartphone reduces available cognitive capacity."

Yup, your phone being nearby is probably distracting you... even if you don't realize it!

The study comes our way from McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas, Austin.

In one experiment, researchers found people whose phone was left in another room had notably better "working memory capacity" and "fluid intelligence" than people who left their phones on their desk or put them in a bag next to their desk.

Here's the abstract:

Our smartphones enable—and encourage—constant connection to information, entertainment, and each other. They put the world at our fingertips, and rarely leave our sides. Although these devices have immense potential to improve welfare, their persistent presence may come at a cognitive cost. In this research, we test the “brain drain” hypothesis that the mere presence of one’s own smartphone may occupy limited-capacity cognitive resources, thereby leaving fewer resources available for other tasks and undercutting cognitive performance. Results from two experiments indicate that even when people are successful at maintaining sustained attention—as when avoiding the temptation to check their phones—the mere presence of these devices reduces available cognitive capacity. Moreover, these cognitive costs are highest for those highest in smartphone dependence. We conclude by discussing the practical implications of this smartphone-induced brain drain for consumer decision-making and consumer welfare.

If you're interested, I'd recommend reading the full study HERE.

 
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